Author(s): 

Roth, J. E.
Kelly, J. P.
Sydeman, W. J.
Colwell, M. A.

Publication Date: 

2004

Type of Document: 

Journal Article

We estimated core areas and home-range sizes and evaluated sex differences in home-range size, seasonal variation in movements, and space use for breeding Common Ravens (Corvus corax) in western Marin County, California. There were no significant interannual differences in average core area or average home-range size for either sex, although there were small-scale shifts in home-range use for 67% of females and 63% of males. There was no significant difference in home-range size between the sexes. Homerange size was positively correlated with distance to food source. Ravens traveled shorter distances from the nest during the incubation 1 nestling stage compared to other stages of the breeding season. Core areas were centered around nest sites and food sources, with significantly aggregated locations for 83% and 100% of females in 2000 and 2001, respectively. Males were more variable in their use of space, with significantly aggregated locations for 38% and 44% of males in 2000 and 2001, respectively. Individual variation in homerange size, movements, and space use was likely due to differences in the distribution of important food sources in the area.

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Citation: 

Roth, J. E., J. P. Kelly, W. J. Sydeman, and M. A. Colwell. 2004. Sex differences and space use of breeding common ravens in western Marin County, California. Condor 106: 529-539.

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